Have you ever stopped to wonder why people choose to work at your company? For many, it’s all about the pull factors—the things ‘pulling’ candidates and employees into a company. Last week, we talked about the things pushing employees out of your company, but what about the things pulling them in or keeping them there? Whether you cultivate these pull factors or not, they are there.

Location

You may not think about it, but commute times are a huge thing for most employees. In fact, commute times are one of the biggest push factors for employees. It just so happens that commute time can also be one of the biggest pull factors. When you are searching for candidates, try to keep your search as local as possible. The further employees have to drive the more stressed and unproductive they are likely to be.

Benefits/Pay

Again, this is a huge push and pull factor for employees. Employees are just as likely to leave a company as they are to stay at or apply to a company based on compensation and benefits. The benefits and pay you offer employees are huge factors. Before you just start throwing numbers around, you need to make sure you are offering fair wages and the best benefits you can possibly afford.

Challenging

Employees want to work at a place that challenges them. It’s no secret that most employees are more productive when they feel like the work they are doing challenges them. Many know that they can’t advance their careers without being challenged. Don’t hire employees who will just “get by.” Instead look for candidates who take on challenges and rise above them. Ultimately, those are the ones who will stick around.

Room for Advancement

Just like with providing challenging work, employees want to be somewhere there is room for advancement. If you are constantly hiring from outside of the company, rather than within, then you are more than likely going to lose some of your star employees. As you’re making hiring decisions, evaluate whether a current employee could fill the roll.

What are the pull factors at your company? Do you have any tips on creating pull factors? Leave your stories and suggestions in the comments section below!